Day 10 – The Recruiting Process and Your Athlete Profile

This is the day ten of our team’s virtual mid-season training camp. Each day for 28 days, there will be a short assignment for you to do to continue your development. These assignments are mandatory for players and coaches. Parents are also encouraged to participate.

In preparation for our meeting with Shaun Reagan, the Head Coach of the University of Waterloo Warriors Women’s Hockey Team, we need to start thinking about the process of being recruited.

The Recruiting Process

  1. Identify the schools and programs that you are interested in. This will narrow down your options. Let’s say that you are interested in entering a degree program in Architecture at an Ontario university. Only four schools in Ontario have an Architecture program: Waterloo, Toronto, Ryerson and Carleton. Luckily, all four have women’s hockey programs.
  1. Introduce yourself to the coaches at the schools you’ve targeted. You can easily find contact information for the coaches on each school’s athletic website. For example, if you search for “head coach University of Waterloo women’s hockey“, Coach Reagan’s name comes up at the top of the results.

    Some programs will want you to contact them by email with an introductory cover letter. Other programs will have an online questionnaire that they’ll want you to fill out. We’ll discuss more about how and when to introduce yourself and get noticed on another day.
  1. From here the process will be mostly driven by the coaches. They may ask you to send them video. They might arrange to come and watch you play. This usually happens at showcase tournaments where they can see a lot of players from many teams in a short amount of time. They may schedule an online interview with you. They may invite you to attend one of their summer camps or come for a campus visit. This could include a tour of the campus and possibly a practice with the current team.

    The coaches are trying to determine if you are, (a) a good enough player who can contribute to their team on the ice and, (b) that you will be a good fit and a successful student at their school.
  1. Hopefully, the coach may make you an offer to join their team. Obviously, these offers are conditional on you getting admitted to their school. They may ask you to sign a letter of intent or an AFA (Athletic Financial Award) which would outline any athletic scholarship money that you will receive.

Your Athlete Profile

One of the tools that you should have to persuade coaches that you’ll be an asset to their team and university is an Athlete Profile. Think of this as a resume of your accomplishments. It is simply a list of all your accomplishments and contact information, that highlights your athletic achievements.

There are several ways that you’ll use your Athlete Profile:

  1. To send to coaches
  1. To use as a handy summary when you are filling in online profiles and questionnaires. You’ll be able to cut and paste from the document to speed up the process and make sure that you don’t miss anything important.
  1. You can use it as a resume when applying for jobs. This is good to have particularly when you don’t have a lot of job experience.

Your Athlete Profile should include:

  • Your name and contact info
  • Your current team, jersey number and position. The jersey number is important so coaches can find you on the ice or in video.
  • Some people include a head shot. This may make it easier for coaches to find you at an arena.
  • Your intended field of study and start date.
  • Your date of birth, height and weight.
  • Your academic average and academic awards. Coaches want to know that you are a good student.
  • A list of your current and recent teams with your coaches names and important stats if you have them.
  • A list of school sports and awards.
  • A list of any jobs or volunteer work that you’ve done.
  • Any training or certifications that you’ve completed (for example, First Aid and CPR training)
  • Anything else that you think will make you stand out.

You should highlight anything on your Athlete Profile that would make you stand out.

Resources

Here is a good sample Athlete Profile that you can download and edit to start making your own.

Today’s Assignment:

For today…

  1. Complete today’s workout on the TeamBuildr app. Be sure to mark each exercise complete as you finish it.
  1. Download and read the Sample Athlete Profile.
  1. Think of three specific things that you could include on your Athlete Profile that might impress a coach. One that you have already accomplished, one that you are working on now and another that you work towards in the future. Try to think of unique examples that your teammates might be able to use as well. POST your answer to the team WhatsApp group.

    For example:
    1. Senior Public School – Female Athlete of the Year award
    2. Volunteering at the local animal shelter
    3. Hockey Canada Referee Course – I’d like to take this in the summer.
  1. Start creating your own Athlete Profile. Don’t worry if there isn’t too much on it yet. Your goal is to build it up over time. If you’d like me to critique your profile, email it to me when you’ve got it finished. This is NOT part of today’s assignment.